Top 5 Rated Books to Read Based on Popular TV Shows

Though a trying time, the beginning of April also marks a new chapter in spring reading, with new books offering similar storylines to current popular shows.

1. If You Love “Outlander”…

Book to Read: A Witch in Time by Constance Sayers (Redhook, Available now). 

For fans of the Starz series Outlander, Sayers’ A Witch in Time allows readers to leap through centuries. The book centers on Helen Lambert, who has lived several lives dating as far back as Paris in the 1890s. In each of her lives she is cursed to relive the tragic events that lead to her ultimate demise. With each rebirth, she develops powers that may save her from her fate, but can she master her powers before her time is up?

2. If You Love “Little Fires Everywhere”…

Book to Read: Behind Every Lie by Christina McDonald (Gallery Books, Available now). 

If you’ve already power read through Celeste Ng’s Little Fires Everywhere and are binging the Hulu adaptation starring Reese Witherspoon and Kerry Washington, then dig into Christina McDonald’s mystery Behind Every Lie. The book centers on Eva Hansen who, after waking up in a hospital bed after being struck by lightning, discovers that her mother has been brutally murdered and police say all evidence points to her as the killer. In an effort to defend her innocence, Eva travels to her mother’s London home to search for answers only to find more secrets and violent memories.

Eva’s journey to recover her missing memories is similar to Little Fires Everywhere‘s Elena Richardson’s quest to uncover the mysterious history of her new tenant, Mia Warren.

3. If You Love “A Million Little Things”…

Book to Read: Brunch and Other Obligations by Suzanne Nugent (She Writes Press, May 5). 

In the opening moments of ABC’s A Million Little Things, Jon (Ron Livingston) is a successful and beloved real estate titan, but shocks his loved ones after abruptly committing suicide. Soon his close-knit circle of friends are left to pick up the pieces after losing him. Nugent’s book Brunch and Other Obligations also tells a heartfelt story, centering on Nora, Christina and Leanne who seemingly have nothing in common. Nora is best described as a quiet bookworm; Christina is a high-profile attorney, whereas Leanne spends her days being carrying on mom duties. Despite being different, the glue that holds them all together is their best friend Molly who leaves them one dying wish – to meet for brunch every month for a year. 

4. If You Love “Mrs. America”…

Book to Read: Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Moment Forgot by Mike Kendall (Viking, Available Now). 

FX’s upcoming limited series Mrs. America starring Cate Blanchett may not be out until April 15, but the series has already been teased as one that centers on the true story of the feminist movement to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment led by conservative Phyllis Schlafly. Readers can get a taste for the 1970s fight for women’s rights in Kendall’s Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Moment Forgot. Throughout her book, Kendall emphasizes on the idea that feminist movements don’t always support those fighting for basic needs. While some feminists fight for equal rights and benefits in the workplace, Kendall argues that others are fighting for fundamental rights like access to education, food and safe neighborhoods.

5. If You Love “Haunting of a Hill House”…

Book to Read: Hairbrush and the Shoe by Jeanne D. Stanton (SparkPress, April 21). 

Fans of the paranormal and shows like Netflix’s Haunting of a Hill House will find many similarities in Jeanne D. Stanton’s chilling true ghost story. The author becomes a ghost-hunting detective as she has received numerous claims that her family’s 150-year-old townhouse is haunted. She stops at nothing to uncover the truth including spending a sleepless night in an allegedly haunted bedroom, creeping along the edges of rooms in search of cold spots, and more. Using her knowledge as a Harvard Business School case writer, she uses her wit, research and the counsel of noteworthy professionals to debunk the age-old question, “Do you believe in ghosts?”proving Halloween can still be celebrated even in Spring.