4 Tips What NOT to Do at an Audition

Don’t use the director or producers who are in the room as the characters in the scene and look directly at them. It makes them wildly uncomfortable. They want to watch you, not be part of the scene. Just look directly over their heads or use the cameraperson and the reader to direct your looks.

1. Understand that the weekends are sacred

Don’t email a casting director—unless they are a good friend—on a weekend. They often get unsolicited emails from actors who send them their reels on weekends. They’ve also gotten emails from actors they don’t know, asking them to look at their headshot proofs (and they attach them). This is rather presumptuous, especially on a weekend, when all of us need time to regroup, recharge, and detach from work whenever possible.

2. Remember responsibility is on you and no one else

Don’t blame the reader. Make the reader the star of your audition. According to acting coach professionals, you should engage fully no matter who’s reading those lines. Likely your reader will engage—at least somewhat—if you show up.

3. Check any and all attitude at the door

The best auditions are the ones where people come in determined to do their best, and enjoy the process. Those people are in the moment. They are not in their heads. They are open to listening and rolling with the punches. They remember to breathe when the camera turns on. Those who come in with an attitude of desperation about getting the job, or an attitude of any kind actually, tend to not do so well with me.

4. Never doubt that you are singular

Don’t forget: Casting directors have seen this scene done many times by experienced actors. They can recite the lines! They know each and every moment.